• "Carova" refers to the cluster of communities that are located just north of Corolla. These communities include Seagull, Penny's Hill, Swan Beach, North Swan Beach and Carova Beach.
  • Carova is bordered to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, and bordered to the west by the Currituck Sound.
  • Though many folks consider Carova to be part of the chain of Outer Banks' barrier islands, Carova, and the Currituck Banks, are in fact located on a peninsula and connects with the state of Virginia.
  • The highest elevation is Carova is about 16' feet above sea level, which is in the "uplands" or maritime forest region, close to the Currituck Soundside.
  • Carova is roughly 11 miles long, and about 2 miles wide at its widest point. Its northern border is the Virginia State Line, and its southern border is the paved NC Highway 12 that leads into Corolla.
  • There is a blockade at the Virginia border which separates Carova from its neighboring northern state. This means that visitors can only access Carova via NC Highway 12 to the south.
  • There are roughly 200-300 year-round residents in Carova. In the summertime, this population grows to several thousand visitors every week.
  • Carova is home to some of the Outer Banks' largest vacation rentals. Due to lax building restrictions, these vacation estates can be 25 bedrooms or more.
  • Despite Carova's popularity in the summer months, the area is nevertheless one of the most unpopulated and desolate regions along the Outer Banks.
  • There are no paved roads in Carova. The only way to access the region is via a 4WD vehicle.
  • Because the speed limit on the Carova beaches is an average of 25-30 mph, at most, visitors who are staying in the area will be roughly 10 minutes to 30 minutes away from the closest grocery stores, gas stations, and restaurants (which are all located in Corolla.)
  • Carova is home to two huge, preserved parcels of intentionally undeveloped land - the 4,570 acre Currituck National Wildlife Refuge and the 965 acre Currituck Banks National Estuarine Preserve.
  • Carova is also home to the famed Corolla wild horses, who freely roam both the beaches and the soundside communities.
  • There are no alligators in the sound, however there is plenty of wildlife, including a number of fish, wading birds, and the Currituck Banks' famed waterfowl.

 

Things to do in Carova

Things to do in Carova

Despite the limited development, Carova visitors who appreciate and adore the great outdoors will find plenty of ways to stay entertained.Be sure and enjoy the following activities on your next Carova vacation, and make the most out of your visit to the Outer Banks' most wild region.

Educational Activities

Educational Activities

On the Outer Banks, it's easy to throw in a little education in with a vacation filled with fun, adventures, and new explorations.

Outer Banks Birding

Outer Banks Birding

For bird lovers, the Outer Banks is hard to beat. This delicate chain of barrier islands is not only home to dozens of different native shorebirds, but also thousands of migrating birds who make a rest stop on the Outer Banks every year. Add to this the fact that the islands have hundreds of miles of deserted beaches, maritime forest, and marshlands for species to quietly flourish, and it's clear that the Outer Banks is literally for the birds.